COBALAMIN (B12)

Functions
Methionine regeneration
DNA and RNA synthesis
Maintain sheath of nerve fibres and promote their normal growth
Help Bone cell activity and metabolism
Part of coenzymes methylcobalaminand deoxyadenosylcobalamin used in the synthesis of new cell
Reform folate coenzyme
Help some fatty acid and amino acid break down
(Whitney et. al., 2014, p. 319-312 and 323)

Signs of Deficiency
Anaemia, fatigue, paralysis, sore tongue, loss of appetite and constipation(Whitney et. al., 2014, p. 320 and 323).

Synergistic Nutrients
Vitamin A, B1, B2, B5, B6, C, E, biotin, calcium, cobalt, copper, folate, iron, methionine, N-acetyl cysteine, omega-3 fatty acids, phosphate and selenium (Osiecki, 2010, p. 51).

Recommended Dietary Intake (per day)
Adults                                         2.4 µg
Pregnancy                              2.6 µg

Upper Limits  (per day) None established
(Australian National Health and Medical Research Council, 2017)

Dietary Sources Value per 100 g
Lamb, liver, grilled, no added fat 76.5 ug
Mussel, blue, steamed 20 ug
Octopus, boiled, no added fat 17.8 ug
Chicken, liver, raw 16.6 ug
Abalone 15 ug
Oyster 15 ug
Sardine, Australian, whole, raw 8.3 ug
Sprat, blue, wild caught, flesh, skin & bones, fried, no added fat 7.4 ug
Mullet, yelloweye, fillet, baked, no added fat 6 ug
Egg, chicken, yolk, raw 4 ug
Beef, mince, lower fat, stir-fried, no added fat 3.6 ug
Snapper, fillet, steamed, no added fat 3.3 ug
Lamb, roasting piece, shoulder, lean, roasted, no added fat 3.2 ug
Beef, steak, boneless, fillet or tenderloin, lean, grilled, no added fat 3 ug

(Food Standards Australia New Zealand, 2019)

References

Australian National Health and Medical Research Council. (2017). Nutrients. Retrieved 28 January, 2019, from https://www.nrv.gov.au/nutrients

Food Standards Australia New Zealand. (2019). Minerals. Retrieved 28 January, 2019, from           http://www.foodstandards.gov.au/science/monitoringnutrients/nutrientables/nuttab/pages/default.aspxhttp://archive.foodstandards.gov.au/consumerinformation/nuttab2010/nuttab2010onlinesearchabledatabase/onlineversion_code.cfm?&action=nutrientList

Osiecki, H. (2010). The Nutrient Bible (9th Ed.). AG Publishing: Australia

Whitney, E., Rolfes, S.R., Crowe, T., Cameron-Smith, S. and Walsh, A. (2014). Understanding Nutrition: Australia and New Zealand Edition (2nd Ed.). South Melbourne, Australia: Cengage Learning.

CALCIUM

Functions
Part of bone structure – frame that holds the body upright and attachment points for muscle
Calcium bank – source of the mineral when there is a drop in blood calcium
Involve in muscle contraction and relaxation, nerve functioning, blood clotting and blood pressure
(Whitney et. al., 2014, p. 388 and 395)

Signs of Deficiency
Stunted growth in children and osteoporosis in adults (Whitney et. al.,  2014, p. 395)

Synergistic Nutrients
Vitamin A, C, E, D, K, arginine, boron, carnosine, chromium, copper, lysine, magnesium, methionine, phosphorus, selenium (Osiecki, 2010, p. 165)

Recommended Dietary Intake (per day)
Men 19-70 years                            1,000 mg
Men > 70 years                                1,100 mg
Women 19-50 years                    1,000 mg
Women > 50 years                        1,300 mg
Pregnancy 14-18 years              1,300 mg
Pregnancy 19-50 years            1,000 mg

Upper Limits (per day)
Adults or Pregnancy                    2,500 mg
(Australian National Health and Medical Research Council, 2017)

Dietary Sources mg per 100 g
Cheese, parmesan, finely grated 1,121
Sardine, canned in water, no added salt, drained 540
Salmon, Australian, canned in brine, drained 352
Tahini, sesame seed pulp 330
Tofu (soy bean curd), firm, as purchased 320
Nut, almond, with skin 250
Fig, dried 200
Bean, soya, dried 180
Anchovy, canned in oil, drained 167
Snapper, flesh, grilled or barbecued, brushed with olive oil 163
Cod, Atlantic, dried, salted 160
Crabmeat, canned in brine, drained 154
Bean, haricot, dried 150
Nut, brazil, raw or blanched 150
Snapper, flesh, raw 123
Egg, chicken, yolk, hard-boiled 115
Seed, sunflower 100
Bean, red kidney, dried 95
Nut, pistachio, unsalted 90

(Food Standards Australia New Zealand, 2019)

References

Australian National Health and Medical Research Council. (2017). Nutrients. Retrieved 21 January, 2019, from https://www.nrv.gov.au/nutrients

Food Standards Australia New Zealand. (2019). Minerals. Retrieved 21 January, 2019, from           http://www.foodstandards.gov.au/science/monitoringnutrients/nutrientables/nuttab/pages/default.aspxhttp://archive.foodstandards.gov.au/consumerinformation/nuttab2010/nuttab2010onlinesearchabledatabase/onlineversion_code.cfm?&action=nutrientList

Osiecki, H. (2010). The Nutrient Bible (9th Ed.). AG Publishing: Australia

Whitney, E., Rolfes, S.R., Crowe, T., Cameron-Smith, S. and Walsh, A. (2014). Understanding Nutrition: Australia and New Zealand Edition (2nd Ed.). South Melbourne, Australia: Cengage Learning.

Iris Analysis (Iridology)

The eyes are not only the window to the soul but also to the health and wellbeing. We inherit the eye colours and patterns from three generations behind us; parents, grandparents and great grandparents and each iris is unique similar to a finger print. The development of the eye dispositions depending on the way we eat, drink, think, live and love (Miller & Dixon, 2016, p. 14-15).

Iris is the name of the Greek goddess of the rainbow similar to eyes which come in many colours and ology means study in Greek. Hence, iridology (iris analysis) means the study of the eye coloration.  Iridology can guide an individual on over or under activity in particular areas of the body (Jones, 2018).

In addition, iris analysis is a screening tool to examine inherent predisposition and the colour and structure of the iris which reflects to organs and tissues through the optic nerves. For this reason, iris analysis helps identify areas for nourishment to  prevent illness and optimise wellbeing (Miller & Dixon, 2016, p. 14-15).

Would like to find out more on you wellness from the iris? Make an appointment  at one of Naturo Potion clinics for an iris analysis session.

References

Iridology.com (2018). What is Iridology or Iris Analysis?. Retrieved 17 November, 2018, from,
https://iridology.com/what-is-iridology-or-iris-analysis/

Miller, T. & Dixon, S. (2016). The Integrated Iridology Textbook (2nd Ed.).   Lake Munmorah, NSW:  Inter Health Aust.

What Does a Naturopath Do?

A naturopath supports a person wellness holistically and treats the whole person by looking at the person’s diet, lifestyle, stressors, background and medical history. The naturopath uses screening tools such as iris, blood, stool, urine and hair analysis and functional testing to assist in the treatment. Nutritional and herbal medicine, diet and lifestyle recommendation and therapies such as massage, acupressure or Bowen therapy maybe integrated in the treatment (Better Health Channel, 2018).

Naturopathic principle is based on the body can heal itself with support from the healing power of nature to the body, mind and emotion. The naturopath can relieve numerous conditions in all ages and some naturopaths are also qualified in emotional healing utilising flower essences. Both well and unwell person can benefit from naturopathy in enhancing the body to healing itself naturally and preventing from illness (Australian Natural Therapists Association, 2018).

The seven core principles of naturopathic medicine are:

  1. The healing power of nature (vis medicarix naturae). The body is believed to have an ability to heal itself.
  2. First do no harm (primum non nocere). Naturopaths favour noninvasive treatments to reduce risks of side effects and refer to other health care practitioners when necessary.
  3. Find the cause (tolle causam). Naturopaths find and eliminate the underlying cause(s) of disease.
  4. Treat the whole person (holism). Naturopaths treat the whole person by taking mental, emotional, spiritual, physical, dietary, genetic, environmental, lifestyle and other factors into account.
  5. Preventive medicine. Following a healthy lifestyle recommending by naturopaths can help prevent disease and retain minor illness from developing into a serious or chronic condition.
  6. Wellness and health promotion. Naturopaths promotes positive emotion, thought, intention and action which will help healing the disease quicker than the treatment alone.
  7. Doctor as teacher (Docere). Naturopaths educate the patient to be responsible in their own health.

(Micozzi, 2006, p. 307-309)

References

 Australian Natural Therapists Association (2018). Naturopathy. Retrieved 26 October, 2018, from,
http://ftp.australiannaturaltherapistsassociation.com.au/therapies/naturopathy.php

Better Health Channel (2018). Naturopathy. Retrieved 26 October, 2018,     from,          https://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/health/conditionsandtreatments/naturopathy

Micozzi, M.S. (2006). Fundamentals of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (4th Ed.).   St Louis, Missouri:   Elsevier USA.